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Updated guide to expat taxes in France

November 10th, 2017 No comments

When you live in France as an expat, one of the most important topics that has a lasting impact on you is taxation. We all hate it, but it’s an essential part of the expat experience. Plus, it funds important services for healthcare, retirement, education, infrastructure, etc. I recommend you hire an accountant to help you with taxes, because of all the regulations, codes and exceptions. But these links and guides below can be a helpful start.

A map of world currencies (Gerry Rea Partners)

Here are some key links:
Main French government website for taxes
UK guide to taxes on foreign income
US IRS info on taxes
Canada Embassy in France (under “Fiscalité”)
French Property guide to expat taxes (not just property tax)
Expats Paris Visual Guide to French Tax Returns (awesome)

Lastly, Expatica has a great page about doing your taxes in France.

It covers the wide array of topics below.
If you have any tips or stories, please feel free to post as a comment.

  • Dual taxation in France
  • Calculating your taxes in France
  • French tax rates 2017
  • French taxes for non-residents
  • Filing your French tax return
  • French tax refunds and credits
  • Paying your French taxes
  • Other mandatory French taxes for residents
  • French capital gains tax
  • French wealth tax
  • French property taxes: owners and renters
  • Inheritance tax in France
  • VAT in France
  • Corporate tax in France
  • Social security taxes in France
  • French tax authority

France encouraging foreign entrepreneurs with French Tech Ticket

French startup & tech entrepreneur & influencer Roxanne Varza recently covered France’s announcement that it will be creating a more attractive business climate for foreign entrepreneurs in France.

Hollande_France_FTT_visa

March 2, 2016 by Roxanne Varza
FRANCE OPENS ITS DOOR TO FOREIGN ENTREPRENEURS

Today, was a big day for foreign entrepreneurs in France – who were received by the President at Elysée Palace. They are still few but the population is starting to grow. Especially now that La French Tech (France’s national program to promote and support its local tech entrepreneurs) has successfully launched a program specifically designed for foreign entrepreneurs called the French Tech Ticket.


#FTTicket by numbers

50 teams from over 1,000 applicants were selected for the first edition of the program. They represent 23 different countries. And let me tell you, their projects are incredible. Startups from Israel, the US, India, Russia, Chile and more have come to France to develop projects that concern everything from diamond-based water purification to construction robots. When I met the startups in February, I was literally blown away. Seeing these entrepreneurs confirmed a long-held belief of mine; France is actually insanely attractive to foreign entrepreneurs.

Not so easy?

France may not have a reputation for being the easiest country to do business in – but that reputation is dramatically changing. The government is striving to make radical changes and is really listening to the needs of the local ecosystem. Today’s event was proof to me that the administration is willing to make a difference. Obviously it’s even harder when once is a foreigner in France – which is why the French Tech Ticket’s approach is really spot-on. The 1-year program places entrepreneurs in various French incubators, provides financial support of up to 25,000 Euros, mentoring, tax breaks for the selected teams and more. It’s a really great first step in the right direction.

Foreigners, welcome to France.

Every year I am contacted by people around the world who want to come to France but they don’t know how to do it. Well, it’s about to get a LOT easier. People who want to launch startups, work in companies and whathaveyou – there are visas and programs that will come out within the next year for you. Just wait and see.

More to be done.

There is still a lot more that we can improve but I am truly excited to see that the government is finally paying attention to such an important topic – and acting on it. People seem to always think that French startups are, well, French. Not anymore. France is really going global.

Questions with Bupa International about expat issues, moving abroad

January 10th, 2014 No comments

Bonjour!

I will be enhancing my content this year to provide more insight about expat issues.

Bupa International is known for working with international expatriates, employers and families.

They were recently able to answer some of my questions below that are relevant to expat issues. Please see those questions and answers below (note British spelling at some points).

They also recently interviewed me on expat issues, and that article will be posted later.

In addition, I’d recommend checking out their free guide to moving to France, available on this page.

What issues have you seen develop for expat clients moving abroad for the first time? What kinds of information do expats seek?
Moving abroad for the first time can be both exciting and daunting, and the issues facing expats often depend on individual circumstances. Those who are taking their family with them, for instance, may have the added responsibility of finding suitable schools for their children, and so issues can sometimes relate to the standard of education and any potential language barriers they may face.

A recent study from the Daily Telegraph identified the most common issues people moving abroad requested information about. Unsurprisingly, issues such as tax, domicile and residence featured high on the list, as well as information regarding employment, visas and work permits. International health care and insurance is another important aspect of moving abroad, and one which it is crucial to read up on in order to find the best arrangement for you and your family. Many people also enquire about international money transfers and currency exchange, whilst information on the transfer of UK pensions and overseas pensions is also frequently requested.

How easy is it for expats to get coverage for their families while living abroad?
We understand that modern day life can often bring about quick changes, such as moving abroad due to work commitments. Whilst an individual may have personal health cover, it is crucial to ensure the entire family are protected by a suitable health policy. Because of this, we have made it easy to tailor your health cover during your policy, meaning additional family members can be included as and when required.

Does Bupa prefer to work directly with both international and local employers rather than freelance consultants?
We strive to work with local employers wherever possible, but depending on location it may sometimes be impossible to rely solely on local or international employers. Varying legislations around the world mean that some Partners or Brokers may be required in order to give us the coverage needed. Our focus is always on providing the best possible service.

Credits:
http://www.bupa-intl.com/

Expat and US tax issues seminar in Paris Jan. 25

January 10th, 2012 4 comments

First and foremost,

A healthy, successful and happy new year to you all! I hope you had a restful vacation. I’m back in Paris after a nice trip back home to the US.

As 2012 evolves, there will be an increasing amount of events. One of my goals is to continue to keep you informed about expat events that could be of interest to you. Here is one that came to me just recently. You can contact her for more information (address, etc.).

The law firm Kipling Avocats will be organizing on January 25, 2012 at 2.00 pm in its offices in Paris a two hour seminar on US tax issues for expatriates and the new tax regime applicable to trusts. Anyone interested may contact Virginie Marrervmarrer@kiplingavocats.com.

Marks and Spencer to return to France this year

According to BBC News, famous British retailer Marks and Spencer is set to return to France this year, after a 10 year absence. They will open a 15,000 square foot store on the Champs-Elysées later this year. Article below.

1 April 2011 Last updated at 08:20 GMT
Marks and Spencer to return to French retail market

Marks and Spencer has announced it is to re-enter the French retail market, 10 years after shutting down all its European stores.

The company said it would open a 15,000 square foot store on the Champs-Elysées in Paris later this year.

M&S also said it was in talks with its partner SSP to launch a number of its Simply Food stores, under franchise, in Paris.

The retailer is also planning to launch an international online service.

M&S closed all its European stores in 2001 in order to focus on its core UK business.

“Marks and Spencer has great brand awareness here in France and a place in customers’ hearts,” said Marc Bolland, Marks and Spencer’s chief executive.

The new French store and website are expected to open ahead of the Christmas trading period.

M&S is the UK’s largest clothing retailer with a significant presence in the food market.

SNCF announces new strikes starting April 6

According to Bloomberg News, France and Britain will both experience rail strikes in the coming week. For the British, you can see more details by clicking on the links to the articles. I focus on France here.

Business Week quoted Bloomberg News:

Societe Nationale des Chemins de Fer, or SNCF, plans strikes in April in the third walkout this year at the French railway. The CGT union, SNCF’s biggest, is asking drivers to call attention to demands on wages and working conditions. Freight workers, ticket-sales staff and other workers may join the strike in following days, Severine Leblond, an administrative assistant at the CGT, said today by phone.

New York Times In Transit travel blog:

Planned Rail Strikes in France and Britain
Bloomberg is reporting that in France, the biggest union of the S.N.C.F., the French national railroad, also plans strikes beginning April 6, the third walkout this year to call attention to its demands on wages and working conditions.

The union, the C.G.T., has been joined by the smaller C.F.D.T. labor group in calling on train drivers, a C.G.T. representative said Wednesday. Freight workers and other employees are set to join the strike in following days.

For British expats: London and Colonial launches EU SIPP for expats

November 17th, 2009 1 comment

London and Colonial launches EU SIPP for expats
International Investment| 16 Nov 2009 | 15:05
Author: Sitanta Ni Mathghamhna

London and Colonial has today announced the launch of the EU SIPP, for individuals resident outside the UK.

The EU SIPP is similar to UK SIPP but enables a wider range of investments including residential property in both the UK and EU, provided they are not used by either the SIPP member or a connected person.
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It allows for a tax free lump sum of 25% of the fund value to be taken from the age of 55, with the remainder providing income, which can be paid monthly, quarterly or annually. There is the additional option to receive ad hoc payments during the year.

The SIPP is primarily aimed at ex-patriot individuals who have been living outside the UK for five tax years or more.

Adam Wrench, Product Development Manager at London & Colonial, says: “When investors move abroad they typically leave their pension behind in the UK or transfer to a QROPS.

“Once they have been resident overseas for at least five tax years, transferring to the EU SIPP will give them more flexibility to manage their retirement options and to make provision for their dependents.”

The EU SIPP pays out 100% to beneficiaries on the member’s death, whereas in the UK, tax rules means up to 82% of an individual’s pension fund is lost on death, even if the member is a non UK resident at the time.

Adam Wrench adds “This provides the opportunity for estate planning to be undertaken knowing tax will not be automatically deducted from the pay-out.”

“Quite often where a husband and wife have emigrated together, in the event of the death of one of them the surviving spouse will return to the UK. With the EU SIPP the non-residency status of the scheme is locked in.”

Additional features of the scheme include no restrictions on borrowing either for the purchase of commercial or residential property or for other purposes, compared to a 50% restriction under UK SIPP rules.

For Brits, France is the top expat destination

November 13th, 2009 2 comments

France the most popular expat destination

Halifax International has released a new report on expat trends, with intriguing information on where they actually move.

4% of British expats already own a home overseas with around a quarter saying that they are contemplating buying or moving abroad in the future. Nearly one third of Britons considering the move are under the age of 35 and more than two-fifths of those who have made the move said they have no intention of returning home.

Despite public opinion generally being that most expats move to Australia, New Zealand or South-East Asia, the report reveals that France is the number one destination for Brits abroad.

France held a 16% share of the expat total, well ahead of second placed Spain (10%) and the USA (8%). Australia was joint fourth along with Germany and Switzerland.

The figures did reveal definite trends amongst age groups, with Australia named as the most popular place to live by those aged 16 to 35. Spain and France were the European leaders for this age bracket. For those expats aged between 35 and 45 Italy was named as the preferred European destination.

British pensioners said Canada was their ideal overseas destination, just ahead of Australia, New Zealand and Spain. One in six of all pensioners have considered moving overseas.

An estimated 5.5 million Britons live abroad according to Public Policy research, with 400,000 leaving the UK in the last year alone.

International health insurance: News update: 12 November 2009

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