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France’s Fête de la musique June 21, RER interruptions …

Today is the 30th annual Fête de la musique (Festival of music), a French tradition across the country. Despite the rainy weather in Paris, expect bands in the streets (in addition to pubs and bars) of all different flavors.

Learn more about the agenda at the website above.

For those not in Paris, there are many concerts elsewhere in France. Check with your local tourism office or city hall.

In Paris today, there will be some delays on the RER suburban rail lines, notably RER B, which connects downtown Paris to Roissy Charles de Gaulle airport. Information below from RATP’s website.

Mardi 21 juin 2011, État du trafic à 9h15 : Trafic normal sur les réseaux Métro, Bus et Tramway.

Préavis du syndicat CGT concernant les lignes A et B du RER zone RATP :
RER A :
Trafic quasi normal.

RER B :
1 train sur 2 entre Denfert Rochereau et Robinson / Saint Rémy-lès-Chevreuse.
Pas de trafic entre Denfert Rochereau et Gare du Nord.

Prévisions pour la journée :

RER zone RATP

RER A :
3 trains sur 4 en moyenne sur la journée
(interconnexion maintenue à Nanterre-Préfecture)
Voir les horaires détaillés
A partir de 20h30 et tout au long de la nuit jusqu’au lendemain matin : Trafic assuré à 100%

RER B :
De 16h30 à 20h30 : 1 train sur 2 entre Denfert Rochereau et Robinson / Saint Rémy-lès-Chevreuse
Voir les horaires détaillés
Après 20h30 et tout au long de la nuit jusqu’au lendemain matin, 1 train sur 3 entre Denfert Rochereau et Robinson / Massy-Palaiseau / Saint Rémy-lès-Chevreuse.

Nota: Des précisions vous seront communiquées à partir de 9H30 pour le trafic en heures creuses (entre 10h30 et 16H30 et après 20H30).

La RATP met à la disposition de ses voyageurs
un numéro vert : 0 800 15 11 11 et pour les téléphones mobiles : wap.ratp.fr

Paris RER traffic to be slow Friday May 13th

I guess Friday the 13th is bad luck at times….

Just to give you a heads up, there will be some disruptions on the Paris RER suburban lines this Friday (metro, bus, and tram lines should not be affected).

Below you’ll see a notice from the Paris public transport service RATP. You can read an article in French about the demonstrations here.

Good luck!

Trafic normal sur l’ensemble des lignes RATP et Transilien SNCF.
A noter, vendredi 13 mai, une manifestation sur la voie publique, pour plus d’infos, cliquer sur Manifestations.

Prévisions à 24 heures pour le vendredi 13 mai 2011 :
A la suite des préavis des syndicats CGT, FO, SUD, et UNSA pour la journée du vendredi 13 mai, la RATP prévoit un trafic :

Métro : Trafic normal.
Le service sera renforcé sur les lignes 1, 4, 6 et 14 du métro.

RER A zone RATP : 1 train sur 4.
Interconnexion maintenue à Nanterre-Préfecture.
La SNCF prévoit 1 train sur 2 entre Nanterre-Préfecture et Cergy / Poissy.

RER B zone RATP :
La RATP prévoit 1 train toutes les demi-heures aux heures de pointe
entre Denfert-Rochereau et Saint-Rémy-lès-Chevreuse / Robinson.
Tous les trains auront pour départ et terminus Denfert-Rochereau.
L’interconnexion à Gare du Nord avec la SNCF ne sera pas assurée.
La SNCF prévoit 1 train sur 2 entre Gare du Nord et Aéroport Charles de Gaulle / Mitry-Claye.

Bus et Tramway : Trafic normal.

Communiqué de presse version PDF, cliquer ici.

La RATP met à la disposition de ses voyageurs
un numéro vert : 0 800 15 11 11 et pour les téléphones mobiles : wap.ratp.fr

Paris transport system slowed down by snow, Eiffel Tower shut

December 8th, 2010 No comments

So after much of France was hit by significant amounts of snow (15 inches in Lyon, etc.), Paris is finally getting hit by some winter weather (very uncharacteristic for Paris in general, especially at this time of year). However it is not as bad, and total snowfall for the Paris region is predicted to be 5 to 6 inches maximum. But you can never be 100% sure. For the latest weather conditions, check out Méteo France’s map of weather warnings (you’ll see the weather warnings are not limited to Paris).

Right now the Paris RATP public transport system is experiencing significant delays, with the bus network “paralyzed” as crews clear the streets (they are not used to snow here). Metro lines 5, 6, 8, 9 and 13 are experiencing delays. RER A and B are having some technical problems as well. See their site for more information. You can also see for RER trains updated information on this site.

National railway operator SNCF has also warned of 30 minute delays or more for some TGV’s (high-speed trains). France24 reports on traffic delays due to weather and that the Eiffel Tower was shut down today.

For up-to-date air travel info, check with your airline. BBC says that Charles de Gaulle airport had temporarily stopped flights.
You can see some video here.

I know I walked to lunch today from my office, the snow was coming down quite hard and the streets had yet to be cleared. Good luck and try to enjoy the beauty of the snow!

French strikes set for Nov. 23, but don’t expect large turnout

November 22nd, 2010 No comments

The contested pension reform has become French law, but some unions (CFDT, CGT, FSU, Solidaires, Unsacette) and other opponents to the measure are insisting that the strikes must go on. But it likely won’t have any important impact, except for annoying commuters and parents. However, traffic will not be nearly as disrupted as other days. It has been a long road of reform and protest, as France24 writes.

Le Volontaire has a list of strikes organized around France, by départment (and city).

Left-wing newspaper L’Humanité unsurprisingly calls this an “unjust reform” and supports the strikes, with a list of cities participating (similiar to the one above, with some variation). In Paris, the action will start at metro Opéra at noon, pass by la rue du Quatre Septembre, la Bourse des Valeurs, palais Brongniart and finish at place de la Bourse around 2pm.

On the other side of the political spectrum, business newspaper Les Echos (like the French Wall Street Journal) is calling this the “last-ditch stand” (baroud d’honneur) of unions.

According to the SNCF’s site, TGV, Téoz and Intercité trains will not be affected. However, certain regional TER trains could be (look by region). So far the Paris area RATP website is not updated with strike information, but will likely have delays on certain bus lines that go to métro Opéra.

THIS JUST IN: The following bus lines will be interrupted with irregular intervals between about noon and 2pm tomorrow in Paris: 20, 21, 22, 27, 29, 39, 42, 48, 52, 53, 66, 67, 68, 74, 81, 85, 95 and Roissybus. This is especially important for those planning on taking Roissybus from Opera to CDG Airport. If you think this may disrupt your plans, you can opt for RER B at about an equal cost (around 9 euros), or taxis will run you about 35-40 euros. The

For updates on RER suburban line trains, you can see this site. Lyon’s TCL transport system will not be affected. For updates on other cities’ transport systems, you can check this link from a previous strike day. You can check the status of trains in major stations at this site.

France still under strike tension with increasing violence

October 21st, 2010 3 comments

Environ 1 200 personnes ont convergé vers la Guillotière. Certaines en ont profité pour se défouler / Stéphane Guiochon (Le Progrès)

So “la révolution” continues. More like an increasingly violent rebellion lead by stubborn individuals who do not seem to understand the principles of economics. But la vie continue, and the government will eventually win. I certainly understand frustration with Sarkozy and his administration, as they have not been exactly stragetic in their communications, and financial corruption within undermines their image (like l’affaire Bettencourt, etc.) but the underlying truth is that retirement reform is needed, and 62 is quite a modest start. Here is a guide about how the reform will likely affect you.

President Sarkozy is still planning on facilitating the labor market to boost employment, so those concerned with unemployment are right to raise their voices, but they should not be disrupting the economic activity and well-being of the country; there are other means of communication than provocation in the street and taking the country hostage. For now, here is an update on the situation…

Violent incidents continue between protesters and police in Lyon’s downtown Presqu’île district, and you can see more coverage of this here and here by the local Lyon newspaper Le Progrès. The TCL public transport system is still shut down in the downtown area, for security measures. According to a Lyon Le Progrès poll, 65% of respondents think that the strike movement will not end soon. You can see pictures of the Lyon action here.

Meanwhile in Marseille, the airport was blocked this morning by strikers in addition to other disturbances throughout the city (public transport and ports blocked, garbage not collected…pictures from Marseille courtesy of BBC.) This action and others have disrupted daily life for many French, and even Lady Gaga has decided to postpone her Paris shows from Oct. 22-23 to Dec. 19-20. On the Paris RER suburban rail network, there were spontaneous disruptions throughout Thursday despite overall improvements on the RATP public transport system (with some disruptions, look under “traffic”) and the SNCF national railway system (though there are still delays). Fuel shortages still persist, with over 25% of gas stations empty, almost 2000 more short on products and this could disrupt Toussaint (All Saints) vacation weekend Nov. 1. But the situation is gradually improving with government forces intervening to gain access to fuel depots.

Meanwhile, national buffoon and desparately in need of a haircut, Bernard Thibault (leader of the CGT union) has called for a new day of strikes next week. They are planning to announce the 1st day for next week, either Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, and the 2nd day of strikes would be either Saturday Oct. 30 or Sat. Nov. 6. Now they’re striking on the weekends, that’s just great. If they strike on the holiday weekend, there just might be an insurrection against the SNCF.

Students, both university and high school, are becoming increasingly involved in the strikes and demonstrations (and violence), with hundreds of schools blockaded throughout the country and up to 10 universities blocked as well.

What is happening in the government?

They are trying to accelerate the reform currently being debated in the Senate, with the text to be reviewed by Friday evening, 254 amendments awaiting validation at the time of publication, and a commission of 7 National Assembly Deputies and 7 Senators, to vote on the entirety by next Thursday Oct. 28th at the latest. They have shown a willingness to discuss certain measures, notably a point system for pensions, to please unions like the CFDT, but this does not satisfy everyone.

Sarkozy remains firmly opposed to violent demonstrators, saying “they will not have the last word” and almost 2000 have been arrested since Oct. 12.

The New York Times covers this story well.

I’ll keep you updated.

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